Juvenile Probation and Parole Officer Careers in New Hampshire

In New Hampshire, juvenile probation is referred to as “conditional release.” Both juvenile probation and parole services are monitored by the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Division, Juvenile Justice Services. Unlike most states, New Hampshire juvenile officers are responsible for supervising both the probation and parole operations of the courts.

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The Juvenile Justice Services is divided into 20 judicial districts located all across the state. Juvenile probation and parole officers in New Hampshire do not have peace officer status and are not authorized to carry or use firearms while on duty, but they are authorized to make arrests when they need to. The officers are responsible for monitoring juveniles that are on probation to make sure that they are adapting to a life without criminal activity, while also monitoring juvenile that are on parole after they have been released from the John H. Sununu Youth Services Center.

Education Requirements for Juvenile Probation and Parole Officers
in New Hampshire

New Hampshire juvenile probation and parole officer jobs require a minimum of at least a bachelor’s degree from an accredited university, college or institute of higher learning. A master’s degree is preferred, but not mandatory in New Hampshire, which makes it one of the most demanding states in the country in terms of educational requirements.

It is also preferred that the college degree (be it a bachelor’s or master’s) be in one of the behavioral sciences, such as counseling, social work, psychology or sociology for example.

Training to Become a Juvenile Probation and Parole Officer in New Hampshire

If hired, recruits in New Hampshire become juvenile probation and parole officers through a formal state-sponsored training program. During the first year of employment with the agency, juvenile probation and parole officers are required to complete 180 hours of training while on the job. The field training teaches the officers the skills that they will need to perform the job successfully.

During this period of time, the employees are kept on a probationary status while their progress is monitored by a supervisor.

Continuing Training to Become a Juvenile Probation and Parole Officer

After completing the first year of employment and the 180 hours of field training, the juvenile probation and parole officer will be taken off their probationary status with the department. But, that does not mean training is over, as the officers are then required to complete 40 hours of additional training each year that they remain with the New Hampshire Department of Juvenile Justice Services.

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