Parole Officer Careers in the Diamond Bar Division

The Diamond Bar division of California Adult Probation Operations covers the southern end of the state, extending from the coast to the Arizona border. It includes Orange, Imperial, Riverside, San Bernardino and San Diego Counties, with unit offices in the cities of Bermuda Dune (Palm Springs), Chula Vista, El Centro, El Cajon, Escondido, Fullerton, Irvine, Moreno Valley, Oceanside, Pomona, Riverside, San Bernardino and Victorville. The division’s main office is located in Diamond Bar.

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How to Become a Parole Officer in the Diamond Bar Division

Parole Officer in California is a state position. To find out if there are any open jobs in the Diamond Bar division, either call the division headquarters at 909/468-2300, or go to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation website. All applicants must submit a state application form and take the standard written test.

Parole officer candidates must be U.S. citizens who are over the age of 21; have either a bachelor’s degree or two years of college and two years of relevant experience. Important personal characteristics include:

  • Honesty
  • Punctuality
  • Preparedness
  • Responsibility

Qualified individuals progress through the hiring process which may take up to 12 months to complete before becoming a parole officer in Diamond Bar. Components of the process include:

  • Written exam
  • Vision test
  • Drug screening
  • Fingerprinting
  • Physical fitness test
  • Background investigation
  • Written and oral psychological evaluations
  • Medical exam

All new recruits will complete a 16-week training course that covers such things as physical fitness, report writing, firearms use, California parole law and arrest/control tactics. Parole officers in the Diamond Bar division earn an annual salary of $42,412 to $65,581.

Diamond Bar Parole Officers at Work

Parole officers are peace officers who guide and supervise parolees released from state correctional facilities. Especially intense scrutiny is given to sex offenders, especially in San Diego County, which has seen more than two dozen child abductions over the last 50 years, including the highly publicized abductions, rapes and murders of young teenagers Amber Dubois and Chelsea King by John Albert Gardner III., who had been released from prison after serving five years for molesting a 13-year-old boy.

SAFE (Sexual Assault Felony Enforcement) Task Force

Parole officers in San Diego are among the law enforcement officers who make up the SAFE task force that is dedicated to preventing child abductions and other sexual crimes. On June 22, 2011, 300 SAFE task force members, along with drug and firearms searching dogs, knocked on the doors of 1012 sex offenders located throughout San Diego County. They contacted 800 of these offenders to remind them that they are being watched. Sixty-one offenders were out of compliance in some way, and a wide assortment of pornography, laptops, alcohol, marijuana, and children’s toys/clothing was seized. Fourteen of the offenders were arrested on the spot for serious parole violations or other suspected crimes, including murder. It is believed that large cooperative efforts like SAFE  are critically important strategies for preventing crime and enhancing public safety.

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